Four and a half types of sentence

Introduction

Introduction

What if we were to tell you that, in this entire series of lessons about sentence construction, we've only looked at 1 type of sentence?

Crazy! I mean, look at all this stuff we've covered!

We've seen how you can combine different real-world elements together in different ways:

Griphook jumped down from his shoulders.

Harry Potter and the Deathly HallowsJ.K. RowlingSource

In cold winters the Queen does revert to knitted woollen hose for warmth.

Shakespeare's London on 5 Groats a DayRichard TamesSource

We've seen how you can combine multiple sentences together with connectors to create different relationships:

He tapped his own life force because he wanted me dead.

The Woman Who Rides Like a ManTamora PierceSource

I could see he was alive even though he made no sign or movement.

Unbelievable!Paul JenningsSource

We've seen how sentences are made up of clauses, and how clauses can be layered up inside one another to make more complex meaning:

Bod heard Scarlett choking back a scream.

The Graveyard BookNeil GaimanSource

The sounds of night aren't really what's keeping me from Burke and Wills, though.

That Eye, the SkyTim WintonSource

The sounds of night aren't really what's keeping me from Burke and Wills, though.

That Eye, the SkyTim WintonSource

The sounds of night aren't really what's keeping me from Burke and Wills, though.

That Eye, the SkyTim WintonSource

And yet here we are saying we've only shown you 1 type of sentence!

But don't panic. Those solid foundations we've built looking at 1 type of sentence apply just the same to the 3 (and a half) other types, with only a couple of tweaks.

We'll touch on a bit of that grammar stuff (just to show where it's different from what we've covered in other lessons), but the main focus of this lesson is the function of different sentence types. In other words, what is the writer—or character—trying to achieve by using sentences like:

It was a long drive home.

WonderR.J. PalacioSource

'What's wrong?'

Burning for RevengeJohn MarsdenSource

Don't fight these men.

The Golden CompassPhillip PullmanSource

Oh, Auntie Sponge!

James and the Giant PeachRoald DahlSource

Then complete silence.

Burning for RevengeJohn MarsdenSource
Did you spot the snippet that's the same type as the sentences we've seen in the previous lessons?

We'll start the lesson by looking at each type individually. Then we'll take a look at how different sentence types can work together for even more effects!

Do I need to have done the other sentence construction lessons before I do this one?

Like what you see?

You’re not logged in!

If you want to save your writing, login and either assign this lesson to yourself or access it via your group.