Understanding clauses

All about clauses

Modifiers

Modifiers are extra pieces of information you can give about an event.

Sajid scowled horribly.

Flour BabiesAnne FineSource

In the snippet above, the adverb 'horribly' is a modifier. It tells us more about how Sajid scowled, but we don't need it in order to understand what is happening.

For example, this is how the sentence looks if we delete the modifier:

Sajid scowled.

We could also add more modifiers to the clause to give even more information about Sajid scowling:

Sajid scowled horribly at his friend.

Or even more:

Every morning, Sajid scowled horribly at his friend.

Paste this text into the textbox below and keep adding modifiers. How many can you add before the sentence becomes hard to follow?

Every morning, Sajid scowled horribly at his friend.

Your turn

We've now looked at verbs, subjects, and modifiers.

That leaves us with only one more clause element to unpack: objects.

Objects are a little harder to understand than the others, but we'll take it slow and look at lots of examples.

Like what you see?

You’re not logged in!

If you want to save your writing, login and either assign this lesson to yourself or access it via your class.